Camp Recovery Center Review

Camp Recovery Center Overview

Camp Recovery Center (The Camp) is located in northern California in Scotts Valley with Intensive Outpatient (IOP) facilities located in nearby areas. The 25-acre campus has residents’ cabins that lookout to majestic redwood trees the area is famous for. The Camp has offered services to adults and adolescents since 1984 and their services include residential, outpatient, aftercare, and detox.

Assessment and Treatment

Patients are admitted to the Camp based on their history, needs and goals. While the Camp can admit people with mental disorders like anxiety, depression and PTSD, the facility’s website makes it clear that it does not have the ability to assist individuals with more severe mental illnesses. Adults and adolescents are both admitted, but have separate living areas and are treated in separate programs.

Treatment largely focuses on holistic care, involving a combination of individual and group counseling. Occasionally, group counseling sessions are separated by gender or age. There is a focus on relapse prevention, cognitive behavioral therapy, creative therapies, and other activities like yoga, acupuncture and meditation. Additional physical activities include personal training, sports and other recreational games. While residents are exposed to the 12-step program it is not the primary focus of treatment.

For adolescent residents, their treatments, as described above, are at the Meadow Lodge and include access to a fully accredited academic program.

Once patients leave the facility, there are outpatient programs for continuing care. Also, throughout the year retreats and sober activities are organized by an alumni association.

The Camp’s Staff

Most of the staff are either certified alcohol and drug counselors and/or licensed advanced alcohol and drug counselors.

Accommodations/Amenities

The Camp Recovery Center's wooded campus includes walking trails, a swimming pool, a tennis court, and a ropes course.

 

Reviews from Alumni

Reviews by individuals who have attended treatment at the Camp are mixed. A few reported to Rehabs.com that they were satisfied with their treatment and with the staff. K.L.W. wrote, “Everyone at The Camp was very kind and understanding. I am thankful for the tools and what I was given—a second chance and forgiveness by my family. I relapsed after 3 months. However, it was definitely worth every penny. I could not have gotten clean and sober without them!” Kristin said, “It’s minimalist, strict, bare bones, no-nonsense TREATMENT.”

Another positive review on Rehabs.com, this time from John said, “They taught me a new way of life. I was able to take the teachings and grow. Almost 17 years sober now. I would consider re-entering if I ever relapsed.”

Negative reviews included criticisms of the staff as inadequately trained and the therapy as insufficient. The most negative review was posted on Yelp, by Karen, who wrote, “This place is terrible. They just warehouse people for 25-30 days with minimal counseling, from sub par therapists… I understand that in order for someone to recover they must do a lot of the work themselves. However having trained professionals that can offer real therapy is what you are paying for when you come here. You won’t get that at The Camp.”

More moderate complaints about The Camp included feeling the facilities were outdated and that more activities were needed.

Reviews from Friends & Family

Once again reviews on Rehabs.com were more favorable than those posted on Yelp. While there were only five family members of previous patients who reviewed The Camp on Rehabs.com, most felt the program was effective and their loved ones’ lives were changed. C.T. wrote, “I enjoyed the family group therapy sessions a lot.” C.T.’s husband was the one who attended the program and she felt that he “made wonderful connections with people there.”

Of the negative reviews on Rehabs.com, two reviews by loved ones rated the facility with two stars. One anonymous reviewer wrote, “they do not push individuals to complete assignments or do inner work to support recovery once they leave.” This reviewer thought the program was too expensive and not worth the money. I.D.H. also gave a negative review, but this was because their loved one used resident outings to drink alcohol while in treatment.

Jose, reviewing on Yelp, had a similar experience to I.D.H., said “The camp does not make sure drugs are not brought into their facility. A new resident brought in drugs and my son along with a few others all joined in using while they were supposed to be detoxing. My son was kicked out, however the man who brought the drugs into the recovery center was allowed to stay as his family had just paid the camp a lot of money, whereas my son only had four days left to complete his 30 days.” The idea that the treatments do not live up to the costs was expanded upon by other negative reviews. Some reviewers speculate that the place is a scam. Another Yelp reviewer, Molly, wrote, “My family member attended this program for 30 days and never even saw a licensed psychiatrist.” Molly gave The Camp an overall rating of one star.

Affordability

The Camp reports they accept most private insurance plans. Additionally, The Camp works with American Healthcare Lending for those who qualify for financing.

*The Addiction Advocates have no affiliation with The Camp Recovery Center. They can be reached by dialing the number above.